Best of the Best–Club Sox Head Covers Offer Complete Coverage

Club Sox logo

 

When I run across a golf product that is unique, or I think I’d like to buy, it has to pass the test of functionality. It has to work, for me, on the course. I don’t have a list of “product testability functions” that are tested in a lab. The ultimate criteria for a product fitting LocalGolfer.com’s “Best of the Best” designation is does the product work for me,would I put it in my bag, and would I recommend it to our readers? In my view ClubSox club covers fit the requirements nicely.

Bentley and his pal
Bentley and his pal

I don’t know about you, but I get a kick out of the myriad club covers I see out on the golf course. I think I’ve seen it all in the 30 plus years I’ve been golfing. Golfers have a profound proclivity toward dressing up their bag to fit their personalities. I’ve seen club covers of every animal from dogs and cats, to mice and gophers, horses heads and horses rear-ends, too. No, I’m not talking about golfers themselves. Although, one time there was this one golfer. . . . But, I digress. I must admit, I have even been a victim of the club cover identity purchase when I found a driver cover that looked like my dog, Bentley.

DSCF5141_cropClub covers are tedious. Generally, I end up losing them. They fall off the clubs and never get turned in. They are bulky, difficult to put on, and take time away from moving to my next shot. If I leave them in the basket during my round, I end up leaving them in the basket after the round . . . gone.

Club covers are necessary. They come with the club for a reason–to protect it. Head covers were originally designed to protect the heads and shafts of your woods from damage caused by the clubs jostling around in your bag, especially ones with graphite shafts. And according to one factory rep I met at a golf show, they’re also meant to produce an “identity factor” of their own.

Recently, I ran across a set of club covers that fit LocalGolfer’s “Best of the Best” requirements and more–ClubSox. My first impression of the head covers was positive simplyOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA because of their look. Their slim design gives them a tight look in the bag, and they are aesthetically keen. Another plus to the slim design is they don’t interfere with taking out and replacing other clubs.

Another positive is the personability factor. On the ClubSox site, I could choose from a variety of colors and styles. I chose the green and gold “squiggles” design. I liked how the stripes on the sleeves show the number of the fairway woods.

Functionally, all my clubs are graphite, and I liked that the sleeve was long enough to protect the shafts from rubbing on my golf bag’s section separators. I was also impressed with the easy-on/stay-on factor, during my round.

If you are looking for club covers with smart design in form, aesthetics and functionality, ClubSox head covers make the grade. They are a welcome addition to my bag, and certainly earn LocalGolfer’s “Best of the Best” designation.
Visit www.golfclubsox.com to learn more.

 

 

USGA adds Four-Ball Format to US Amateur Competition-register now!

 usga_templatelogoThe Amateur Four-Ball Championships are the first to be added to the USGA’s competition roster in more than 25 years.

Men’s and women’s national championships to be conducted in May 2015.

FAR HILLS, N.J. (April 17, 2014) – The United States Golf Association (USGA) announced the opening of entries on Thursday, April 24, for the inaugural U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championships. In 2015, The Olympic Club, in San Francisco, will host the first men’s competition and Bandon Dunes Golf Resort, in Bandon, Ore., will host the first women’s competition. Players can register online (http://champs.usga.org) for both championships through 5 p.m. EDT on Wednesday, Aug. 6.

“The U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championships represent the USGA’s commitment to support and advance amateur competition,” said Daniel B. Burton, USGA vice president and Championship Committee chairman. “This format is broadly popular in all 50 states and at golf clubs nationwide and should produce spirited team play, camaraderie and enjoyment for both the players and spectators.”

The 18th, Seventh, and Eighth Holes of The Olympic Club's Lake Course (Copyright USGA/John Mummert)
The 18th, Seventh, and Eighth Holes of The Olympic Club’s Lake Course
(Copyright USGA/John Mummert)

The 2015 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball is scheduled for May 2-6, with both the Lake and Ocean courses at The Olympic Club set to host 36-hole stroke-play qualifying. The club’s famed Lake Course, which has hosted five U.S. Opens and three U.S. Amateurs, will be the site for the championship’s match-play bracket.

To be eligible, each player must have a Handicap Index® not exceeding 5.4. Partners on each two-man team are not required to be from the same club, state or country and there are no age restrictions. Sectional qualifying, conducted over 18 holes at more than 50 sites across the nation, is scheduled to begin on Aug. 13, 2014.

The championship will comprise 128 sides or teams, for a total of 256 players. Following stroke-play qualifying, match play will begin with 32 sides and conclude with an 18-hole final on May 6.

Pacific Dunes Golf Course
Pacific Dunes Golf Course

Bandon Dunes Golf Resort will host the 2015 U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball on May 9-13. The championship will be played at the resort’s Pacific Dunes Course, the site of the 2006 Curtis Cup Match.

Players must have a Handicap Index® not exceeding 14.4 to be eligible and partners are not required to be from the same club, state or country. There are no age restrictions for each two-woman team. Sectional qualifying is scheduled to begin on Aug. 25, 2014. Nearly 30 sites will host 18-hole qualifying.

The championship will start with 64 sides or teams, for a total of 128 players. Stroke-play qualifying will be followed by match play, starting with 32 sides. A champion will be crowned in an 18-hole final on May 13.

In 2016, the U.S. Amateur Four-Ball will be held at Winged Foot Golf Club, in Mamaroneck, N.Y., while Streamsong Resort, southeast of Tampa, Fla., will host the U.S. Women’s Amateur Four-Ball.

About the USGA

The USGA conducts the U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open and U.S. Senior Open, as well as 10 national amateur championships, two state team championships and international matches, attracting players and fans from more than 160 countries. Together with The R&A, the USGA governs the game worldwide, jointly administering the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status, equipment standards and World Amateur Golf Rankings. The USGA’s reach is global with a working jurisdiction in the United States, its territories and Mexico, serving more than 25 million golfers and actively engaging 150 golf associations.

The USGA is one of the world’s foremost authorities on research, development and support of sustainable golf course management practices. It serves as a primary steward for the game’s history and invests in the development of the game through the delivery of its services and its ongoing “For the Good of the Game” grants program. Additionally, the USGA’s Course Rating and Handicap systems are used on six continents in more than 50 countries.

For more information about the USGA, visit www.usga.org.

Editor’s Note: For more information about Four-ball formats, check out our Contributing Editor, Keith Cook’s article about Match Play

 

2015 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Site Announced

The 2014 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship will be conducted Sept. 13-18 at Hollywood Golf Club in Deal, N.J.

Hillwood Country Club to Host 2015 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship. 

Additionally, Wellesley (Mass) Country Club will host the 2016 championship, followed by Waverley Country Club in Portland, Ore., in 2017.

FAR HILLS, N.J. (April 16, 2014) – The United States Golf Association (USGA) today announced Hillwood Country Club, in Nashville, Tenn., as the host site of the 2015 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship. The championship is scheduled to take place from Sept. 26 through Oct. 1.

“The USGA is proud to bring the U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship to Hillwood Country Club,” said Daniel B. Burton, USGA vice president and chairman of the

Hillwood Country Club
Hillwood Country Club

Championship Committee. “In welcoming Hillwood to the fold of USGA host sites, we are confident that it will provide the stern and complete test of the players’ games found at all of our national championships.”

Dick Wilson designed the course at Hillwood Country Club, which opened in 1957 under the direction of architect Bruce Crabtree. Bruce Hepner, of Renaissance Golf Design, oversaw renovations in 2003 and 2011.

“It is an honor and privilege for Hillwood Country Club to host the 2015 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship,” said Jerry Coleman, president of Hillwood Country Club. “Our obligation as a top-flight club in Tennessee is to give back to the game of golf and our partnership with the USGA for this championship will allow us to host the greatest amateur senior women’s golfers our country has to offer. Our members and staff are excited about this opportunity and are committed to providing a wonderful experience for the participants, officials and spectators.”

Hillwood CCHillwood has hosted numerous statewide events, including the 1963, 1966 and 1971 Tennessee State Opens and the 1975, 1982 and 2004 Tennessee State Amateurs.

While the 2015 Senior Women’s Amateur will be the first USGA championship to be conducted at Hillwood, the club has a long-standing connection to the Association. On June 18, the club will host U.S. Senior Open sectional qualifying for the third straight year and the fifth time since 2002. The club’s 2002 qualifier produced the lone player to win the U.S. Senior Open as a sectional qualifier. Don Pooley survived a 3-for-2 playoff to reach that year’s Senior Open, held at Caves Valley Golf Club, in Owings Mills, Md. At Caves Valley, Pooley defeated Tom Watson in a five-hole playoff to win the championship.

The 2015 Senior Women’s Amateur will be the 14th USGA championship held in the state of Tennessee and will mark the second time the championship will be held in the state. The Honors Course in Chattanooga served as host site of the 2011 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur, won by Terri Frohnmayer.

The U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship was first conducted in 1962. It is open to female amateur golfers who will have reached their 50th birthday on or before the opening day of the championship, and who have a Handicap Index® not exceeding 18.4. Notable past champions include Carolyn Cudone, Alice Dye, Ellen Port, Anne Sander, Marlene Stewart Streit and Carol Semple Thompson.

The 2014 U.S. Senior Women’s Amateur Championship will be conducted Sept. 13-18 at Hollywood Golf Club in Deal, N.J. Additionally, Wellesley (Mass) Country Club will host the 2016 championship, followed by Waverley Country Club in Portland, Ore., in 2017.

About the USGA
The USGA conducts the U.S. Open, U.S. Women’s Open and U.S. Senior Open, as well as 10 national amateur championships, two state team championships and international matches, attracting players and fans from more than 160 countries. Together with The R&A, the USGA governs the game worldwide, jointly administering the Rules of Golf, Rules of Amateur Status, equipment standards and World Amateur Golf Rankings. The USGA’s reach is global with a working jurisdiction in the United States, its territories and Mexico, serving more than 25 million golfers and actively engaging 150 golf associations.

The USGA is one of the world’s foremost authorities on research, development and support of sustainable golf course management practices. It serves as a primary steward for the game’s history and invests in the development of the game through the delivery of its services and its ongoing “For the Good of the Game” grants program. Additionally, the USGA’s Course Rating and Handicap systems are used on six continents in more than 50 countries.

For more information about the USGA, visit www.usga.org.